Frank Herbert – Author, Hero

I was fifteen years old the first time I read Dune. I had been an avid since I was eight years old when I began reading novels in the third grade, and I read the books that inspired me over and over again.

I read all kinds of things, but at the age of fifteen I read mostly fiction, and that age when I first read Dune in 1984, I found it to be somewhat dense and challenging.

I had taken that first copy from the carousel of the library at the alternative high-school I was attending, and which I dropped out of a few month later. I read that copy, perhaps not as carefully as I should, but as carefully as I could, and I went to see the motion picture when it came out in 1985.

Needless to say, I found David Lynch’s adaptation to be one of the worst movies ever made, and with that Dune passed from my thoughts for a time.

However, in the summer of 1988 I was visiting a friend in Montana, and I picked up a copy of Dune from the bookstore in Bigfork. I needed something to read on the bus ride home to Minneapolis.

Four years had passed since my first go at it, and my window on the world had opened wide enough for me to be able to engage the book in a completely different way. I was hooked. I was nineteen years old.

Dune changed my life.

Since then I have read Dune and all six books in the original Dune series, eight times over, as well as everything else Frank Herbert wrote.

He was a giant.

I have given away dozens of copies of Dune throughout my life, and recommended it to more people than I can count, always with the words this book will change your life.

Many of them came back to me to tell me that it did.

Frank Herbert wrote science fiction, but the science he wrote into his fiction had less to do with spaceships and laser beams (though it had those things), and more to do with the science of politics, religion, ecology and psychology, with the human person at the center of his imagination.

Through his insight Herbert challenges the reader to explore what it means to be human, and he asks open-ended questions about the range of human potential in a way that allows the reader to believe in those possibilities for themselves, and his own view of the range of human potential is inspiring. He believe that we can do more, be more, see more of the world than our senses allow…if we are disciplined he believes we can do it; if we are attentive to the world around us, and if we cultivate within ourselves the desire to live a life without fear we will secure a future for humanity beyond our solar system and spread through the galaxy.

He died thirty-nine years ago today, and when he passed a heroic light left the world.

Frank Herbert – Author

I was fifteen years old the first time I read Dune. I had been an avid reader since I was eight years old, when I began reading novels in the third grade. I read the books that inspired me over and over again, I read all kinds of things, but at that point in my life I read mostly fiction, and with that said, at the age of fifteen, I found Dune to be somewhat dense, and challenging.

I had taken that first copy from the carousel of the library at the alternative high-school I was attending. I read it, perhaps not as carefully as I should, but as carefully as I could, and I went to see the motion picture when it came out later that year.

I found David Lynch’s adaptation to be one of the worst movies ever made, and with that Dune passed from my thoughts for a time.

In the summer of 1988 I was visiting a friend in Montana, and I picked up a copy of Dune from the bookstore in Bigfork. I needed something to read on the bus ride home to Minneapolis.

Four years later I was able to engage the book in a completely different way, after the first two pages I was hooked. I was nineteen years old, and in the intervening years I had learned enough and grown enough to understand what Frank Herbert was getting at.

Dune changed my life.

I would read it and all six books in the original Dune series, eight times in sum, as well as everything else Frank Herbert wrote on my quest to absorb his wisdom.

He was a giant.

I have given away dozens of copies of Dune throughout my life, and recommended it to more people than I can count, always with the words this book will change your life.

Many of them came back to me to tell me that it did.

Frank Herbert wrote science fiction, but he wrote science in his fiction had less to do with spaceships and laser beams (though it had those things), and more to do with the science of politics, religion, ecology and psychology.
What is most significant about Frank Herbert’s writing is this: he opens a window for the reader on what it means to be human, and he asks open ended questions about the range of human potential, in a way that allows the reader to believe in those possibilities for themselves.

Frank Herbert is inspiring.

He makes the reader believe that we can do more, be more, see more of the world than our sense sallow…if we are disciplined, if we are attentive to the world around us, and if we cultivate within ourselves the desire to live a life without fear.

He died thirty-four years ago today, when he passed a heroic light left the world.

 

Given First – 2020.02.11
Frank Herbert

Self Awareness

The way in is the way out, you must go through at the gate
Sensei said

We ate the fruit of the tree of knowledge
We consumed a principle of justice, the understanding of good and evil
We became self-aware and cognizant of our failings

We became writers of laws

We wasted the world in selfish-conflict, greed
We became aware, and became aware of ourselves, of our lies
We were mired in the taxonomy of differentiation

We became arbiters of the law

We saw the other as our enemy, making them into effigies
We regarded ourselves with loathing, the cancer of dissatisfaction
We engaged in violent reprisals

We became instruments of the law

We went to the dance with Ego and Id
We were like Caine and Able, the herdsman and the farmer
We were urban and pagan, nomad and builder

The law blinded us to the demands of justice, we were its fools

Facing mirrors that pass through the universe
Gathering new images on the way—endlessly reflexive
The infinite seen as finite
The analogue of consciousness, coded with the cell
Carrying the sensed bits of eternity 1
[1] Herbert, Frank, Chapter House Dune, 1985

Un-reality and the Fake President – Editorial, The Week in Review

Analysis, Commentary, Opinion
11.17.2018

Un-reality and the Fake President

Power does not corrupt it merely attracts the corruptible.

~Frank Herbert, Dune

The current holder of the office of President of the United States is the unparalleled exemplar of this statement. All the little fish that circle around him, feeding off of him, they can’t hold a candle to the corruption in that peevish-little-orange-menace’s bile filled heart.

On Veteran’s Day, six days ago, T-Rump sat sulking in the residence of the of the White House. He did not visit any of the wounded veterans at Walter Reed, neither did the first lady, or anyone from his family.

Not one of the Trump’s went to Arlington Cemetery, to pay their respects to all of the people who are buried there, who gave their lives in our nation’s conflicts.

None of them ever served.

They couldn’t.

The Trumps do not have a modicum of selflessness about them.

T-Rump was sad that his trip to Paris was so poorly received. He spent the rest of the week whining about his bad press.

He lost a law suit with CNN concerning the freedom of the press, and exactly what authority the White House has to grant access to the media. As it turns out, the courts say that they have very little.

T-Rump appointed a man named Whitaker, to be the acting Attorney General of the United States. The appointment appears to be in contravention of protocol, of federal statues, and of the appointments clause of the Constitution itself.

T-Rump does not care.

He pretends to own the moniker of the Law and Order President, while he shortsightedly seeks to subvert the rule of law at every turn.

He does not think the laws of the United States should apply to him or his family, or anyone he chooses to exempt from it, a political ally, a financier, even a murderous Crown Prince from the House of Saud.

Some real critics have emerged against this charlatan from the conservative wing of American politics. They have called out the GOP for having turned itself into a cult of personality.

To win at any cost, has become the name of the game.

The acting Attorney General’s only qualification for the post appears to have been his public and vocal criticisms of the probe being led by Special Counsel Robert Muller, into the conspiracy to defraud the People of the United States, by Russia and a cadre of homegrown actors, many of which served on the T-Rump Campaign, and in his administration, and the obstruction of justice that followed.

The acting Attorney General auditioned for his role on several news outlets and in person, while he served as Attorney General Jeff Sessions Chief of Staff. He met with the Fake President many times, while they plotted this step.

Never mind the fact that his appointment to that office is illegal, never mind the fact that he has several conflicts of interest for which Justice Department protocol will require that he recuse himself. Never mind the fact that he served as a member of the board of directors for a company in Florida being investigate for financial fraud, for bilking senior citizens out of their retirement savings.

Power attracts the corruptible, like moths to the flame, and the biggest flame of them all is the orange tyrant living in the White House.